Dermatology Associates of Bryn Mawr Medical Specialists

Rochelle R. Weiss, M.D.
Daniel B. Roling, M.D.
Caroline M. Groft-MacFarlane,M.D., Ph.D.
Matthew E. Halpern, M.D.
Danielle M. DeHoratius, M.D.
Michael D. Gober, M.D., Ph.D.
Jocelyn M. Confino, MPAS, P.A.-C
Kathryn M. Smore, MPAS, P.A.-C

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

This form of skin cancer arises in the squamous cells that make up most of the skin’s upper layers (epidermis). Squamous cell carcinomas may occur on all areas of the body including the mucous membranes and genitals, but are most common in areas frequently exposed to the sun, such as the rim of the ear, lower lip, face, bald scalp, neck, hands, arms and legs. Often the skin in these areas reveals telltale signs of sun damage, such as wrinkling, changes in pigmentation, and loss of elasticity.
Who Gets It: People who have fair skin, light hair, and blue, green, or gray eyes are at highest risk of developing the disease. But anyone with a history of substantial sun exposure is at increased risk. Those whose occupations require long hours outdoors or who spend extensive leisure time in the sun are in particular jeopardy. Anyone who has had a basal cell carcinoma is also more likely to develop an squamous cell carcinoma, as is anyone with an inherited, highly UV-sensitive condition such as xeroderma pigmentosum.

For more information: http://www.skincancer.org/Squamous-Cell-Carcinoma/